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Olmsted’s Deliberate Approach

Posted on 02/06/2017 by Jean Sexton Comments(2)

The three-mile Approach Road that meanders from Biltmore Village up to Biltmore House is not there by accident—it’s the result of a very intentional and complex design by Frederick Law Olmsted, Biltmore’s landscape designer.

Everything by design

In Olmsted’s own words, “…the most striking and pleasing impression of the Estate will be obtained if an approach can be made that shall have throughout a natural and comparatively wild and secluded character; its borders rich with varied forms of vegetation, with incidents growing of the vicinity of springs and streams and the remote depths of a natural forest.”

The road is a perfect blending of forest and landscape with no hard edges to separate the two. The lack of long-range views is intentional.

“The Approach Road is the first important garden and landscape feature you see on the estate,” said Parker Andes, Director of Horticulture. “It gives you a true feel for Olmsted’s skill.”

Approach Road with mountain laurelOlmsted used native plant materials as the basis for his plan, adding 10,000 rhododendrons as a background element for the road. He also used mountain laurels, native and Japanese andromedas, and other plants.  Evergreens in the foreground add richness, delicacy, and mystery while varieties of river cane and bamboo provide a hint of the exotic and tropical.

“Along the brook and on the edge of the drive, Olmsted planted low-growing plants. For variety of color in the winter, he used hardy olives, evergreens with an olive tint, junipers, red cedars, and yews,” explained Parker. “All of these created the complexity of light and shadow that define a picturesque style.”

Vanderbilt and Olmsted with the crew that dug the Approach RoadChanges through time

Over time, all of Biltmore’s landscapes have matured and changed in appearance. The challenge for today’s landscaping team lies in determining Olmsted’s original intent, and they use archival resources such as early plans, letters of correspondence written during the construction of the estate, and information about Olmsted’s design philosophies to help them stay true to the original vision.

Sometimes, variations from the plan are necessary. For example, Olmsted planted some exotic plants that were not invasive at that time, including Oriental bittersweet, mahonia, and barberry. We’ve replaced those with others plants that offer similar characteristics and looks. Today we know a certain plant will not thrive where it was originally planted, so we select others that are able to thrive in those original locations.

Approach Road in fall“It’s a continual learning process, and each year I discover something new,” said Parker.

To learn more about the Approach Road and the historic aspects of Biltmore’s landscape, try our fascinating Legacy of the Land Tour.

-- Featured image: Approach Road in spring
-- First image: Approach Road with mountain laurel blooms
-- Second/archival image: George Vanderbilt (standing in front row, far right, wearing a light-colored hat) and Frederick Law Olmsted (to Vanderbilt's right) with the crew that dug the Approach Road
-- Third image: Approach Road in fall

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Posted on 03/28/2017 By Barney R

There simply isn't anything as beautifulong & relaxing as The Biltmore in the mountains

Posted on 02/06/2017 By Sue T

I love this road. It is like a time portal between what is now and what was. It gives your mind a space to switch gears, slow down and become engulfed in the Vanderbilt/Olmsted experience. Great blog.

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