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Fall Color and Forestry at Biltmore

At the end of a Fall day at Biltmore. Biltmore was the birthplace of scientific forestry in the United States. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

The Deer Park area behind Biltmore House glows with rich colors each Fall. Biltmore was the birthplace of scientific forestry in the United States. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

The Katsura tree - which has a scent like cotton candy - lives in the heart of Biltmore’s Azalea Garden. The Katsura was one of the trees hand-picked by Biltmore landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. This Katsura is on the NC Forest Service Registry of Champion Trees. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

At 114 feet tall, Biltmore's Dawn Redwood towers over the Azalea Garden. This tree, at 114 feet tall, is on the NC Forest Service Registry of Champion Trees, noted for its size and historical significance. Frederick Law Olmsted selected the species for the grounds of Biltmore. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

The Persian ironwood has a showy fall leaf color, and can be found next to Biltmore’s Conservatory. Landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted hand-picked tree species including the Persian ironwood as part of a plan to reforest overworked farmland purchased by George Vanderbilt for the construction of Biltmore House. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

Another view of the Persian ironwood tree. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

Golden Raintree resides on the pathway through the Shrub Garden, near Biltmore House. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

Landscape architect Fredrick Law Olmsted (seated, center) and George Vanderbilt (standing, center-right) with other key Biltmore figures, 1892.

In April 2022, Biltmore will celebrate the 200th birthday of Frederick Law Olmsted, the father of landscape architecture in America. Olmsted designed Biltmore's gardens and grounds. This John Singer Sargent painting of Olmsted hangs in the Second Floor Living Hall in Biltmore House. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

Frederick Law Olmsted. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

Members of Biltmore's horticulture team plant a white oak sapling in the place where a century-old oak tree once stood. Today, more than 4,000 acres of the estate are managed under a plan written by a certified consulting forester. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

Members of Biltmore's horticulture team plant a white oak sapling in the place where a century-old oak tree once stood. Today, more than 4,000 acres of the estate are managed under a plan written by a certified consulting forester. Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

The hillside where a mighty white oak once stood. After lightning caused its removal in 2020, Biltmore's horticulture team planted a young white oak sampling, seen here - barely - in the same spot. The tree is visible from the road near the Winery. “We decided to stay with a white oak since they are a long-lived tree,” said Parker Andes, director of horticulture. “They represent strength, and have the ability to withstand adversity. It also stays true to Frederick Law Olmsted’s original design intent. The use of large, long-lived trees in pastoral settings, both singularly and in groups, was a signature of his landscapes at Biltmore, and many of his other projects.” Photo credit The Biltmore Company.

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